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Supercars vs Hypercars in 2018

Supercars

Way back in 1920, The Times in London sensationalised the word ‘supercar’ to describe the 6.7 litre Ensign 6 and let’s just say that it didn’t take long for the word to get an official definition in the Oxford dictionary. To bolster the definition – we’ll consider performance, exotic designs and prices over R1 000 000 as the primary yardsticks for supercars in the ‘supercars vs hypercars’ debate.

Remember, we’re not talking about that restored & tuned Mazda RX7 from Tokyo Drift because although it could probably leave a Ferrari California driver inhaling more rubber than oxygen in a drag race – that’s a Tuner car.

We’re talking about slick, poster-worthy cars with tantalising specs and bleeding-edge tech integrations. And although there’s no definite line in the sand here, it’s fun exploring the language of supercar enthusiasts.

On the more affordable flank, the Aston Martin Vantage, Jaguar F-Type and Audi R8 fit the ‘supercar’ bill nicely. And the more ridiculous side? The Porche 918 Spyder or the Aston Martin Vantage will be sure to help you understand the difference between sparkling wine and champagne.

What About ‘Hypercars’?

Well, firstly, all hypercars are supercars – but not all supercars are hypercars. Hypercars push the envelope and are a little more ridiculous design and performance wise. Case in point – the Bugatti Chiron.

Many believe it was Bugatti that actually invented the hypercar with the bona-fide Veyron, and it was so outrageous in its day – it’s hard to argue with that.

Only the the most authoritative and exclusive four-wheel machines make the cut. And we love talking about these shimmering beasts not because we can afford the R155 million + price tag that comes with a Lamborghini Veneno, but because they have always inspired car manufacturers the world over, across many ranges and product lines.

Technology is a moving target, and the upper-echelons have been getting bullseyes for a long time now. Some important examples include: the Lamborghini Muira – an incredible leap forward in car design; or the 1990’s McLaren F1, being the first adopter of a carbon fiber chassis and integrated roll cage’. And the Porche 959 was one of the first to feature a reliable all-wheel drive system.

These incredible machines have always inspired brands and pushed technology to new summits.

Summits we enjoy ourselves, every day.

 

BMW 8–Series Expectations

8-Series BMW – a blast from the past

Discontinued in 1999, the last 8-series you probably didn’t see was a 2-door Coupe with pop-up-headlights. We’ve come a long way since then, and so have the big brands of the German automotive industry…

Many feel as though BMW’s design hasn’t evolved at a rapid enough pace over the last 3 years, especially when compared to Mercedes Benz, known for their more extreme facelifts of late.

Perhaps BMW wasn’t in need of any drastic changes, maybe just a, not-so-little range extension?

A look into the future of BMW

In March 2019, BMW claim we’ll experience “a new form of power, the power of inspiration” with their new 4-wheel drive, rear-wheel bias 850i xDrive.

Focused on luxury, performance and state-of-the-art technology, the 8-series showcases BMW’s appetite to appeal to the more extreme gentlemen among us.

And if the bold, exotic, yet still very muscular design isn’t your favorite draw card, perhaps the whole, ‘0 to 100 in 3.7 seconds’ thanks to a 4.4l V8 twin turbo thing is?

Whether it’s an 8 speed Steptronic gearbox or a 16 speaker sound system – the 8-series should keep you on the bleeding edge of luxury motorsport technology for a good while.

Speaking of technology, there’s an array of driver assistance systems, including a personal co-pilot, which apparently ‘relieves the strain on the driver in monotonous situations like traffic jams.’

J.A.R.V.I.S. – is that you?

We’ll have more details closer to the March 2019 launch.

PS.

Following the 850i, there will be a convertible and an M8 version.
We’ll be in touch.

 

 

 

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